LCT

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Educational technology

The study of information and communication technologies and educational technology represents a rapidly growing area of LCT research, including studies of a major federal initative in schooling, mobile learning in informal contexts, young people's experiences with technology within and beyond formal education, and mythbusting the notion of 'digital natives'.


TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION

(see also DIGITAL EDUCATION REVOLUTION and OLPC, below)

In a series of papers, S.K. Howard is carefully building a well-founded case for the significance of subject areas in issues such as technology integration in classrooms. Some papers do not use LCT explicitly, as they are laying the groundwork for doing so. In the face of serious knowledge-blindness caused by psychologism, such papers are crucial for establishing the need for LCT.

Howard, S. K., Chan, A., Mozejko, A. & Caputi, P. (2015) Technology practices: Confirmatory factor analysis and exploration of teachers’ technology integration in subject areas, Computers & Education, doi: 10.1016/j.compedu.2015.09.008.

Howard, S. K., Chan, A. & Caputi, P. (2015) More than beliefs: Subject-areas and teachers’ integration of laptops in secondary teaching, British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(2): 360–9.

Howard, S. K. and Mozejko, A. (2013) DER-NSW Evaluation: Conclusions on student and teacher engagement and ICT use, Sydney: New South Wales Department of Education and Communities.

Howard, S.K. & Maton, K. (2013) Technology and knowledge: An exploration of teachers’ conceptions of subject-area knowledge practices and technology integration, American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, San Francisco, April

Howard, S.K. & Maton, K. (2011) Theorising knowledge practices: A missing piece of the educational technology puzzleResearch in Learning Technology 19(3), 191-206.


DIGITAL EDUCATION REVOLUTION

A major evaluation of the Australian federal government’s Digital Education Revolution is being undertaken for the Department of Education and Training of New South Wales by Sarah Howard, University of Wollongong.

This project has the dimension of Specialisation at its heart, with a series of survey questions that develop those created by Lamont and Maton for their studies of subject choices and school Music (see Schooling). It involves a large survey of schoolchildren and schoolteachers, as well as case studies. The survey alone will create the largest dataset ever generated within social realist sociology of education.

Howard, S. K., Chan, A., Mozejko, A. & Caputi, P. (2015) Technology practices: Confirmatory factor analysis and exploration of teachers’ technology integration in subject areasComputers & Education, doi: 10.1016/j.compedu.2015.09.008.

Howard, S. K., Chan, A. & Caputi, P. (2015) More than beliefs: Subject-areas and teachers’ integration of laptops in secondary teaching, British Journal of Educational Technology, 46(2): 360–9.

Howard, S.K. (2012b) Keynote: The Digital Education Revolution: The role of knowledge and technology practices in a large-scale 1-1 laptop initiative, e/merge 2012 (www.http://emerge2012.net/), University of Cape Town, South Africa, July.

Howard, S.K. & Maton, K. (2011) Theorising knowledge practices: A missing piece of the educational technology puzzleResearch in Learning Technology 19(3), 191-206.

Howard, S. K. and Carceller, C. (2011) DER-NSW 2010: Implications of the 2010 data collection, Sydney: New South Wales Department of Education and Communities.


ONE LAPTOP PER CHILD

Sarah Howard (University of Wollongong, Australia) and Karl Maton are part of a team of researchers engaged in a major new study (2015–17) in association with One Education Australia, an offshoot of the One Laptop Per Child initiative.  The research is funded by a national 'Linkage' award and entitled 'Investigating the Dynamics of Digital Inclusion'. Contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for further details.


ONLINE PEDAGOGY & CONSTRUCTIVISM

Chen, R., Maton, K. & Bennett, S. (2011) Absenting discipline: Constructivist approaches in online learning, in Christie, F. & Maton, K. (eds.) Disciplinarity: Systemic functional and sociological perspectives. London, Continuum.

Rainbow Tsai-Hung Chen (2010) Knowledge and Knowers in Online Learning: Investigating the effects of online flexible learning on student sojourners . Unpublished PhD thesis (awarded without corrections), University of Wollongong, Australia.

Chen, R., Bennett, S., & Maton, K. (2008) The adaptation of Chinese international students to online flexible learning: Two case studies, Distance Education 29(3) 307-323.

Chen, R., Bennett, S., & Maton, K. (2007) The online acculturation of Chinese student ‘sojourners’. In C. Montgomerie & J. Seale (Eds.), Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2007 (pp. 2744-2752). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.


MOBILE LEARNING AND E-LEARNING

Carvalho, L., Dong, A. & Maton, K. (2015) Foregrounding knowledge in e-learning design: An illustration in a museum setting, Australian Journal of Educational Technology, 31(3): 328–348.

Carvalho, L. (2010) A Sociology of Informal Learning in/about Design, unpublished PhD thesis, University of Sydney.

Carvalho, L., Dong, A. & Maton, K. (2009) Legitimating design: A sociology of knowledge account of the field, Design Studies 30(5): 483-502.

Carvalho, L. & Dong, A. (2007) Knowledge and identity in the design field. In Zehner, R. & Reidsema, C. (Eds.) Proceedings of ConnectED International Conference on Design Education.Sydney, UNSW. ISBN - 978-00646-48147-0


YOUNG PEOPLE & ICTs

Maton, K. & Bennett, S. (2010) The Role of ICTs at the University of Sydney: A report on the experiences and expectations of students and teaching staff. Office of the DVC(E), University of Sydney.

Mythbusting ‘digital natives’

Bennett, S. & Maton, K. (2011) Intellectual field or faith-based religion: Moving on from the idea of 'digital natives', in Thomas, M. (ed) Deconstructing Digital Natives: Young people, technology and the new literacies.  New York, Routledge, 169-185.

Bennett, S. & Maton, K. (2010) Beyond the ‘digital natives’ debate: Towards a more nuanced understanding of students’ technology experiences, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 26(5): 321-331.

Bennett, S., Maton, K. & Kervin, L. (2008) The ‘digital natives’ debate: A critical review of the evidence, British Journal of Educational Technology 39(5): 775-786.

Media coverage:

Mather, J. (2007) Panic over digital natives’ IT mastery ‘premature’, Campus Review 4th July 2007, p.4

Rout, M. (2007) Research shows digital desire overrated, The Australian: University Teaching - A higher education special report, Oct 3rd, p.1

Brabazon, T. (2008) They come not to teach, Times Higher Education Supplement, 3 July 2008.

Leaver, T. (2007) A broad band of ideas: The Learning Futures Symposium, Screen Education,48: 74-77.


OTHER PAPERS and THESES

Chen, R.T-H. (2015) L2 Blogging: Who thrives and who does not?, Language Learning & Technology, 19(2): 177–196.

Carvalho, L. & Goodyear, P. (2014) Analysing the structuring of knowledge in learning networks, in Bayne S, Jones C, de Laat M, Ryberg T & Sinclair C. (eds) Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Networked Learning 2014, ISBN 978-1-86220-304-4

Chatteur, F., Carvalho, L. & Dong, A. (2010) Embedding pedagogical principles and theories into design patterns. In P. Goodyear & S. Retalis (eds) Technology-enhanced Learning: Design patterns and pattern languages (pp. 183–200), Rotterdam: Sense.

Maton, K. (2009) Cumulative and segmented learning: Exploring the role of curriculum structures in knowledge-building, British Journal of Sociology of Education 30(1): 43-57.

Doherty, C. (PhD, 2007) The Production of Cultural Difference and Cultural Sameness in Online Internationalised Education, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Mistri, Gitanjali (PhD, ongoing) A Social Realist Analysis of Academic Professional Development for the Integration of Digital Technologies in Higher Education, Rhodes University, South Africa.

Vahed, A., McKenna, S. & Singh, S. (2016) Linking the 'know-that' and 'know-how' knowledge through games: A quest to evolve the future for science and engineering, Higher Education.

Waspe, T. (PhD, ongoing) The Integration of Education Technology in Initial Teacher Education, School of Education, Wits University, South Africa.

[see also Systemic functional linguistics]

Last Updated on Sunday, 10 April 2016 06:14